Monday, September 29, 2014

China scrambles to censor Hong Kong social media

From Reuters--Hong Kong social media under attack. Read this link
Look at those cell phone cameras--Hong Kong protests
How has social media changed news coverage and protests like this? Reading this post and the two previous, about China and Russia, what is your reaction? Is "democracy" stronger in Hong Kong than here? Answer below--one paragraph. By 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30.

13 comments:

  1. Social Media has completely changed this news coverage and protests, without social media these protests would have ceased to exist. The fact that the government on the mainland of China completely controls what goes on people's social media is more than awful. I can't imagine how that would feel, but with social media, it makes democracy so much stronger/ is helping keep it alive.

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  2. I think social media has given the common man a connection to power that he never had before. For example, in the article the college kid mentioned using social media to protest plan. The government is used to being top dog and controlling everything. Social media allows for a bit for equality in some sense. And with equality, you have a bigger sense of democracy.

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  4. Social media has drastically changed the news coverage because it gives individuals the ability to express their way of thinking. That is what China is trying to prevent so what they decide to do is censor the following information as well as other sites that could be a threat. I would say that democracy is stronger in Hong Kong compare to here, here we can freely express how we feel about a certain topic or issue.

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  5. Social media has given normal people an avenue to relay information. Any type of protest now has the ability to gather followers at an alarming rate. Protestors are able to use social media to get their message across and create a following that would be hard to quiet once started.

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  6. I'd say social media has helped these protest greatly, especially if it gets people to do something like what the above image shows. From reading these posts, I'm interested to see what actually happens as a result of these protests. I would say the "democracy" is strong in China. I'm can't really tell if it's stronger than democracy here. We've seen many protests in recent times here in the states. Ferguson comes to mind. I will say that the democracy is increasing in China, and I'm interested to see where it goes.

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  7. I think that social media has given these protests the power to actually make an impact. Without the power of social media these protests would not be nearly as effective as they are right now. I think the people of china are starving to have some freedom and social media is definitely playing a big role in their attempt to get it.

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  8. In some ways I do believe social media can increase the effectiveness of a protest. Also though governments that can go in and shut down social media sites might have more control over protests through social media. I wouldn't necessarily say democracy is stronger in China, but it is definitely getting stronger.

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  9. Ok, so, if I understand this right, then FireChat is like virtual telepathy. Which I believe is astounding. The occupation of Hong Kong is reminiscent of Occupy Wall Street, the riots in London, and the Arab Spring. Marshall McLuhan said, "The medium is the message." I believe this is the case here. We see the mobile device used as an instrument of organization in a protest. They've tried to black them out,but people just use Bluetooth! It's brilliant! What was formerly known as a cell phone is now an information gathering device capable of publishing content and sharing it around the world. The free exchange of information is a death sentence to authoritarian governments, just ask the British.

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  10. i think social media gave voice to the voiceless no matter how much control some governments such as the Chinese try to take on. We've seen things like this before (Arab spring, Turkey and twitter, etc) and protesters were always able to find other ways through social media to communicate. I Don't think that democracy is strong in china than here, but definitely it will get there one day.

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  11. Once again, decentralized media is proving much harder to control. Honestly, that can be both good and bad. In this case, though, it's definitely good.

    I don't really know enough about Hong Kong to know whether or not they're really more democratic, but they're certainly out of the frying pan and into the fire with regards to keeping it.

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  12. The ability for anything to become "viral" is something new and amazing. Even if you're not looking for it, it'll pop up in your news feed. -Which is amazing. It reaches people who don't read the news and once it goes viral, its hard not to hear about it. After reading both articles, I'm just wowed that this kind of censorship is going on, and wonder if our government is doing something similar but we don't know it. I'm also awed by the impact people can have when they rally together for a cause. As far as democracy being stronger, I think the desire for it is stronger in China than here. Passion is intensified when you're fighting for what you want. But as far as actual democracy, I think America is doing fine. Hong Kong has a whole bunch of problems, and that's why people there feel more patriotic. Our national pride will come back when we have to fight for our rights again, too.

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  13. As a Chinese, I totally understand how it feels when I have no access to some “International” social media. When I was in China, everything I read and saw was under censored. Central government blocked Instagram during Hong Kong demonstration, which I believe, is aimed at preventing people in mainland China from seeing any facts about this incident. If they saw those pictures and contents from “Ins”, some insane people will follow them and join the demonstration. It was funny that this morning, my friend told me that during Instagram was blocked, nobody in mainland China could have access to it. However, the official account of the first lady in China posted a picture of herself, which resulted in a lot of trouble——netizens attacked her official account by commenting below.

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