Thursday, September 4, 2014

New York Times and Vista assignments.

1. Read Josh Wallace's editorial on the Isis execution in today's Vista. Bring it back with you for group discussion and writing assignment Tuesday, Sept. 9.
2. China is cracking down on Hong Kong media. Read this story in yesterday's New York Times. Why was this done, and do you think it will make any difference? Why is Hong Kong an issue for China?  Democracy column dropped.
Comment below by 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8.

14 comments:

  1. I think this was done because China is concerned that certain information given to the public could impact their way of thinking and opinions. Specifically, opinions that China doesn't want its people forming. I don't necessarily think it will make much difference for the long run. It may just postpone what they're trying to avoid. I think Hong Kong is an issue for China because if it starts there, it can spread elsewhere.

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  2. To help protect what is being viewed, they want to have total control. I wouldn't say its a smart move because the information is going to link out one way or another. I think Hong Kong is an issue for China because they don't want to jeopardized in the future.

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  3. In my opinion, the reason this happened is obviously to quiet a voice of protest. Firing Chin may lead to bigger participation in the OCWLP movement, and might prove a gateway to less peaceful tactics if not kept at bay.
    The fact that The Hong Kong Economic Journal is owned by Richard Li, son of the richest man with investments in China, plays a big role in this. Investment stakes in one of the largest business hubs in the world goes without saying.
    Which is why Hong Kong is problem for China. "One country, two systems" is a strange policy. While it keeps international trade afloat, it also lends China to a disjointed, sort of two-legged governing. As the policy's 50 year clock runs out, China's must be anxious to chip away at restrictions, fully regain economic and political control, and stand as one. -While curtailing media freedoms along the way.

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  4. I believe this was done to help China stay in control of it's people. They don't want anyone trying to revolt. I think Hong Kong is a problem because they have rich businessmen that own the rights to large media outlets and I believe they are somewhat controlled by the Chinese government.

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  5. Once people have a taste of freedom, they rarely give it up without a fight. Hong Kong remained under the control of the British until 1997, even though it was signed over in 1984. Under the provisions of the Joint Declaration, Hong Kong was to be a special administrative region, with executive and judicial power of its own. It makes sense to me that the city of Hong Kong would be the stage for a pres freedom battle. It also makes sense that the powers-that-be in Beijing would try to silence any voice that is pro democracy. In addition to that, the Economic Journal knows which way the wind blows. They have no real commitment to press freedom, or free expression. They're just trying to pay the bills like every other paper in the world. If they think the gov't will give them grief for the opinion of a columnist, then they'll shut them up, just like everywhere else. Censorship, it's easier when it's voluntary.
    Here's a link to The Joint Declaration: http://www.cmab.gov.hk/en/issues/jd2.htm

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  6. I think this was done in order to preserve the appearance of Chinese government and steer the peoples minds away from revolting, or the thought that maybe they do not have the freedom they thing they have. The fact that they are trying to make it look like it is a normal employee cut, shows that the government has more power than perhaps others know. As soon as a country limits what is reported in the news, I feel like democracy goes out the window.

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  7. It seems that it is done to prevent thoughts of revolution from the general population. Preventing the population from voicing an opinion that may cause a ripple in the infrastructure of the government(s) seems to be something any government would do to prevent treason in the future.

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  8. In my opinion, China Is concerned with their people having access to information that may persuade the views and opinions of the public. I think the information will leak out to the public in China eventually and at that time the public will begin to form their own opinions. Hong Kong is probably the biggest threat to China and has a large media outlet. I think if information leaks from Hong Kong it will spread very quickly.

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  9. As the article said, it was for editorial purposes, but I wouldn't rule out the possibility of it being for political purposes. I think it might make a difference because this means that a column like this might not be done in a Chinese newspaper ever. Hong Kong is an issue for China because of the democracy movement there.

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  10. The paper claims for business purposes, but that seems suspect. In the long term, the precedent of removing political speech doesn't bode well for the press there, obviously.

    China's initial economic boom is coming to an end, and the people are pressing the party for the next step that'll bring China's newfound prosperity inland. Hong Kong's independence would create a lot of unrest and distrust of the party's competence.

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  11. China says it was done for business purposes but that does not seem to be true. China wants to control the media so they look good. A column about democracy would not make them look good

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  12. In Hong Kong, The Hong Kong Economic Journal has great influence on people. I think the contents of the Pro-Democracy Column may be impropriate so the editor dropped it. And there’s no evidence shows that Chinese government did this. I don’t think it will make a difference. There are still a lot of ways (like other media) to express their democracy demands. Hong Kong, as a Special Administrative Region, is always an issue for China. It’s first a history problem. In addition, as people’s sense of democracy raised these years, more and more Hong Kong citizen began to ask for more freedom in democracy.

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  13. Hong kong is an issue for china simply because both do not share the same history. Hong kong has been deeply influenced by the british control while china did not. hong kong has a pro-democracy culture and before the handover to the Chinese authority both the British and Chinese agreed upon the laws that would outline how Hong Kong would be run the thing that Many "Honk Kongers" believe the Chinese goverment could not fulfil.

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  14. The Chinese government wants to control the media outlets to protect the people from certain news which they fear could lead to revolt. Hong Kong is an issue because the people call for more freedom and a democracy, which can eventually ripple effect throughout the country.

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